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Frequently Asked Questions:

Why should I have a video of my wedding?

Will my videographer be obtrusive?

Do you use bright lights?

Why do I need more than 1 camera?

How important Is HD Video?  What makes it better?

How is audio recorded during the ceremony?  During the reception?

Should our videographer be insured? What type of coverage is necessary?

Will the DVD include a menu and chapters?

How much footage will be captured and how much will be on the final DVD?

Will video of my wedding ever end up on one of those "Embarrassing Moments" TV shows?

 

 

Why should I have a video of my wedding?

Still photos are an excellent way to freeze a moment in time, but we don't live in a series of frozen moments, do we? Video gives you a visual and audible record of your wedding. How wonderful would it be to hear what your parents or grandparents had to say on their wedding day! The "moving picture" aspect of video gives a viewer the ability to put images in context -- to see the events leading up to that "frozen moment". Why was that person smiling so broadly?  Did she hear or see something funny? Are those tears of joy? Was she nervous or excited? Video will help fill in the blanks.

 

Will my videographer be obtrusive?

Our videographers specialize in documentary-style weddings. We strive to document the day's events, not participate in them. While each wedding is unique, we will always do our best to get the perfect shots while staying out of your way and not calling attention to ourselves. If you don't notice us, that means we're doing our job!

 

Do you use bright lights?

While our videographers take great care not to call attention to themselves, there may be times that some additional lighting may be necessary. Although your reception attendees may appreicate the intimate nature of a darkened dance floor, the absence of any significant light could severely limit our ability to shoot high quality video. In some cases, such as during a speech or cake cutting, an extra light may actually be welcomed, serving as a small spotlight to focus the guests' attention on the activity at hand.  This extra lighting will most likely take the form of a moderately bright (10-20 watt) camera-mounted light. If lights are of particular concern to you or your guests, please inform your videographer and/or reception venue of your lighting preference and we will do our best to accommodate your wishes.

 

Why do I need more than 1 camera?

More cameras mean more angles and more opportunities to see what's important.  Wouldn't it be nice to see the groom's face and the bride's face during the vows and not just see the back of someone's head?

 

Additionally, the video editing process requires two unique shots to make it work. Otherwise, you have nothing to edit -- just one long continuous video. To accomplish this with only one camera, you would have to stop recording, move the camera, then start recording again -- potentially missing an important moment. Multiple cameras mean that you always have another shot to "cut" to.

 

How important Is HD Video?  What makes it better?

If you currently own a flat screen tv or are considering buying one, chances are that it's HD capable, so why not take advantage of it? An HD image contains roughly four times the visual information as standard definition video. You may not think about it now, but in 10, 15 or 20 years, standard definition video will look much worse by comparison. Even if you don't order HD Blu-ray copies of your wedding today, you could always do so at a later time.  Besides, a normal standard definition DVD will still look better when made from higher quality original HD material.

 

How is audio recorded during the ceremony?  During the reception?

To offer complete coverage and maximize redundancy, ceremony audio is captured in as many ways and from as many sources as possible.  Camera-mounted "shotgun" microphones will capture music, applause and/or ambient sound.  Wireless microphones are used on the groom and/or the officiant for clear audio of the vows.  If possible, an audio feed from a PA system may also be recorded. Reception audio is recorded using a combination of PA feeds and shotgun microphones.

 

Should our videographer be insured? What type of coverage is necessary?

Yes, your videographer should definitely be insured!  Any professional videography company should carry, at minimum, some form of standard liability coverage.  Some wedding venues may even require it.  A typical liability policy with coverage of at least $1 million would serve to protect all parties involved.

 

Will the DVD include a menu and chapters?

All DVDs include at least one main menu, allowing the viewer to select which video (i.e.: ceremony or reception) to view? Within the DVD, each video will contain chapters set to key moments (i.e.: speeches, cake cutting, garter toss) allowing the viewer to skip ahead to each desired scene.

 

How much footage will be captured and how much will be on the final DVD?

Although each wedding is a unique experience, most will result in 2 to 3 hours of footage per camera, resulting in a final DVD that is normally 90-120 minutes in length.

 

Will video of my wedding ever end up on one of those "Embarrassing Moments" TV shows?

We will not sell or release footage for broadcast without prior written consent from both the bride and groom. We do reserve the right, however, to publicly post clips or make reproductions for our own portfolio, samples, self-promotions, or for professional competition and review. 

 

 

 

 

 

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